Pay-As-You-Drive Personal Auto Insurance – Recent Developments

California private auto was changed forever in 1988 with the passage of Proposition 103. Among other things the regulations provided that insurance companies must accept all good drivers (as defined by them) and rate auto on 3 primary factors: Driving Safety, Annual Mileage, and Years Driving (rather than age of driver).

Later some 40 other factors would have accepted onto a list of other permitted secondary factors, although insurance score is not one of them. Territories were abolished in factor of some statistically-built bands related to accident frequency and other factors. Occasionally, even the number and differentials between bands would be narrowed.

The effect of the original regulation and the consequential changes was to cause or increase subsidies for a variety of policyholders:

  • Drivers with accidents subsidize good drivers
  • Long annual mileage drivers subsidize short annual mileage drivers
  • Urban drivers subsidize rural drivers
  • Nearly everyone subsidizes low experienced male drivers

The existence of these subsidies causes shortages in the marketplace and influences behavior that may not be desirable. For example, if drivers with accidents pay too much overall, this may cause an incentive to under report accidents. Less data is usually not good – the absence of accidents in the database will extremely raise rates for the next lower level of accident-proneness, as the higher risk drivers seem to belong in the lower accident group based on their statistics.

Other effects of forced subsidies are the introduction of new companies that are specialists in the over-priced segment of the market, increases in the number of drivers in the temporary market, and rate increases for truly good risks.

Pay-as-you-drive insurance:

It is the limited number of categories for annual miles driven that catches the attention of regulators and others wanting a more refined rating plan. Number of miles driven looks like a reasonable way to measure exposure and is easily understood by policyholders. Presumably in combination with "where you drive" (territory, that is. Although this is not "where you drive", it's "where you LIVE"), it would seem to cover a driver's exposure very well (see next section for what research shows).

The new proposed regulation is being touted as a "green" provision, encouraging drivers to drive less by having their insurance coverage apply by mile driven. California Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner has proposed this optional rating mechanism, allowing insurers to offer a voluntary option for consumers who are interested in pay-as-you-drive coverage.

Consumer groups are opposed, saying that there is not enough protections in the law for protecting the privacy of insured's everyday activities. Some tracking mechanisms include "OnStar" satellite and GPS-based meters similar to those used in cell phones.

Quoting from the article:

"The Environmental Defense Fund estimates that if 30% of Californians participate in this voluntary coverage, California could avoid 55 million tons of CO2 between 2009 and 2020, which is the equivalent of taking 10 million cars off the road. This would save 5.5 billion gallons of gasoline and save Californians $ 40 billion dollars in car-related expenses. Additionally, the California Air Resources Board has recommended the adoption of pay as you drive as one of the means to meet future climate change gas reduction targets. "

Hard to ignore potential emissions reductions like these numbers.

b> But the research shows:

The research shows that pay-as-you-drive insurance may not get at the true exposure to auto insurance claims for each insured. For liability coverages, age / gender combination, along with insurance score and geography are the largest claim level predictors. For property damage coverage, the model of the car takes over as the number on predictor (the others then follow). This information is from a research paper The Relationship of Credit-Based Insurance Scores to Private Passenger Automobile Insurance Loss Propensity, Michael Miller, FCAS and Richard Smith, FCAS, Epic Actuaries, June 2003.

Pros / Cons of Pay-As-You-Drive:
Pros:

  • Exposure for insurance tied to miles driven – easy to understand by drivers
  • The amount you pay for insurance would be directly controlled by the driver, rather than on factors such as sex, age, martial status, etc. that the driver has no control over.
  • The current proposal is for an optional credit, giving low mileage drivers a choice.
  • Reduced emissions

Cons:

  • The amount a driver pays should be as closely tied to his / her exposure to loss as possible, to avoid cross-subsidies and comply with Actuarial Standards and Principles.
  • Tracking mileage is difficult and some methods proposed inspire fear of lack of privacy in some consumers and consumer watchdog groups.

My opinion is that there are better, less complicated ways to refine the rating plan options when it comes to annual mileage, and still emissions lower emissions and "green" policies. One obvious one is to simply increase the number of mileage bands in the current plans and offer "green" discounts (and debits) based on the type of vehicle covered. Discounts for Prius's, debits for Hummers.



Source by Kimberley Ward

Cheap Car Insurance Broker

Are you looking for a cheap car insurance broker? You are probably asking yourself, "Who is not?" Below are some tips for what discounts to look for, and ask about, when searching for a cheap car insurance broker.

Look for low mileage discounts. If you are an occasional driver, you may be eligible for a low mileage discount. A cheap car insurance broker will see you as less of a risk if your car is not actually out on the road very much.

Stick with third-party insurance. Third-party insurance is much cheaper than full coverage insurance, and depending on the worth of your car, you may want to choose sticking with third-party insurance when seeking a cheap car insurance broker.

Keep drivers to a minimum. When looking for a cheap car insurance broker, keeping the drivers you add to your car insurance policy to a minimum helps. Without the drivers frequently drive the car (s) on the car insurance policy, leave them off of the car insurance policy and save yourself some money.

Keep your car safe. Another way to impress a cheap car insurance broker is by keeping your car safe. If you live in an area that is considered dangerous – especially one that has a lot of car-related crime – an insurance broker is going to see you as less of a risk if you take the steps to safely store your car at night or anytime it is not being driven.

Young drivers – do not give up hope! Young drivers should take advantage of starter policies. These policies, which usually last anywhere from six to eight months, are perfect for young drivers still starting out in the world of driving and car insurance. Starter policies are cheaper than non-starter policies, and they allow the young drivers to build up no claims bonuses. Young drivers should also ask about any driving courses that they take to help them get car insurance discounts.



Source by Elizabeth Newberry

Most Common Types of Auto Repair

If you own a car, at some point, you are going to have maintenance. While some problems are more severe and not very common, other types of auto repair are far more common. When done periodically, these repairs can keep your vehicle operating for years.

Tires

Driving is hazardous to your vehicle’s tires. Nails, pot holes, and even curbs can cause damage to the rubber, forcing you to have it patched or replaced. If you can have the tire simply patched, it is pretty inexpensive, and most patches can hold until the tread is too worn to continue using. However, if there is no repairing the tire, you could be looking at an expensive replacement, especially if you have to replace multiple tires.

Brakes

One of the most common types of auto repair will be the brake system. Over time, your pads will wear out, causing you to have to replace them. This can happen multiple times during the life of your car. While this is a fairly inexpensive replacement, if the drum or rotor needs to be replaced you could be looking at hundreds of dollars in maintenance costs. If you are having trouble stopping, it is most likely the pads are worn out, as the brake lines rarely need maintenance.

Oil Changes

Another common form of maintenance is having regular oil changes. While you may not see this as auto repair, it does keep your engine from being damaged. Fresh oil, with a new filter, every few thousand miles can make a significant difference in how your engine performs. Without this maintenance, carbon deposits can build up, wearing out your piston rings and even seizing up your engine. The cost to replace those parts and clean the block is far more expensive than the occasional oil change.

Fuel System

If you are someone who prefers to fill up their car only half way and then drive it until the warning light comes on, you may be doing more damage than good. Vehicles that are regularly driven with less than a quarter tank of gas run the risk of having their fuel filters clogged up. Additionally, you should have the injectors cleaned and fuel filter replaced by a professional on a regular basis.

Ignition System

Eventually, your battery will wear out. Most are rated to last seven to ten years depending on the brand of battery you purchase. The price depends on the battery and the length it is supposed to last. You might be able to recharge your old battery for much cheaper. However, it will eventually need to be replaced.

Another part of the ignition system that commonly needs to be replaced is the starter. While it is not the most expensive replacement, it can be more expensive than a simple battery replacement. Usually, if you are having trouble starting your vehicle, it is either the battery or the starter. Your local mechanic can test them and tell you which part needs to be replaced before you are left stranded.

Auto repair is part of owning a car. If you take the time to maintain your vehicle, it will last longer than expected.



Source by Ace Abbey

Car Shopping Tip – Save On Fuel And Get $ 1000 From The Canadian Government

Here is a car shopping tip you do not see everyday. In March 2007 the Canadian Government announced in their budget that a rebate would be available for fuel efficient vehicles, referred to as the ecoAuto Rebate Program.

The idea is to reward those drivers who are trying to help with the environment by driving vehicles that are more fuel efficient. So here is a win / win car buying tip for anyone in the market for a new vehicle, drive a vehicle that is more fuel efficient and then get $ 1000 back for your new car purchase!

If you are in the market for a new car you can follow the link at the end of this article for a list of vehicles that are included under this program. Keep in mind that the 2008 model year vehicles have not been released as of yet, but keep visiting the site and in time the 2008 model year will be included.

The an outline of the ecoAuto Rebate Program is as follows:

The progam is applicable to anyone buying or leasing a vehicle after March 20, 2007 as long as the car you purchased is on the list.

Only cars bought or leased in Canada are eligible for the Program. If you purchased your car in the USA then you are not entitled to the rebate.

Individuals, businesses and organizations can apply under the EcoAuto Rebate Program, again as long as the vehicle bought or leased is on the list of eligible vehicles.

It's a pretty simple process however there is no indication as to how long it will take for you to receive your ecoAuto Rebate, understand however that this rebate comes directly from the Canadian Government it is not associated with the car dealership where you purchase or lease your new vehicle. You can get the forms from the Dealership where you initially purchased our vehicle or again follow the ecoAuto Rebate Program link below for all the information you need!



Source by Dennise Ryder

The History of Automotive Repairs – Why We Need Trained Technicians in the Collision Repair Industry

Vehicle History Overview

  • They don’t make them like they used to.

The First Cars

  • The first motor cars were nothing more than a buggy and engine (Generally repaired by blacksmiths and carpenters. These cars were very expensive, which only the wealthy could afford)
  • Model T was the first car mass production on an assembly line in 1908 (Ford’s Vision was to produce an affordable car the average person could purchase)
  • Model T’s came in black only to keep the costs down. (The price came down once the assembly line was streamlined, but in 1908, the cost for a Model T started at $825. By 1913 the cost of the car reduced to $550)

Cars in the 1960s

Cars were made the same basic way up through the 60s

  • Body Over Frame
  • Rear Wheel Drive (Same concept, but the cars were very big, bulky, and heavy)

Except people in the 60s wanted SPEED! They achieved this with Big Block Motors, which created a lot of Horsepower. (The Birth of Hotrods, Rat Fink, Flames, and Pin Striping).

Cars in the 1970s

  • The government place strict fuel economy and emissions control laws
  • Customers demanded cars with increased fuel economy
  • New laws and customer demands started the automotive explosion of engineering ideas and changes in the automotive industry

Changes to comply with Demands and Laws

  • Smaller bodied cars and smaller engines
  • Aerodynamics (Increase Fuel Mileage)
  • Lighter cars by using different materials and designs
  • More work-hardened areas created during formation of panel (Body Lines)
  • Safety

Construction of Interstate Highways + Higher Speed Limits + More High Performance Cars = Accidents and More

Deaths from Auto Accidents

Federal Laws were passed to regulate safety. These laws included:

  • Installation of seatbelts
  • Safety glass windshields
  • Head restraints
  • In 1979, the first driver side airbag was introduced
  • Airbags are mandatory in motor cars produced after 1990
  • Unibody Torque Boxes: Allow controlled twisting and crushing
  • Crush Zones: Made to collapse during collision (To act as an absorber, absorbing the impact)

Modern Day Cars

  • Carbon Fiber Parts
  • Aluminum Parts
  • More Plastic Parts
  • High Strength Steel
  • Boron Steel
  • Unibody Construction
  • Space Frame Construction
  • Computer
  • Hybrid Cars

Now they even have cars that will tell you when you’re lost, where to turn, Parallel Park for you.

Conclusion

While the modern day cars appear to be made cheap and unsafe, they are actually designed to crush or collapse, while transferring the energy around the stronger passenger compartment to protect the passengers from injury.

There is considerably more damage to modern day cars during a collision than the older vehicles, which gives the perception that “they don’t make them like they used to”. However, in reality the cars are taking the impact instead of the passengers.

The lesson was designed to give you a little history, but to also emphasize that just a hammer, dolly and a few wrenches are not going to repair today’s cars. We need highly trained collision repair and automotive technicians to repair today’s vehicles.



Source by Donnie A Smith