Definitions Of The Most Common Medicare Terms

There are a number of Medicare terms that everyone should know if they are policy holders or are about to be. We have listed the more common ones below.

Appeal – a formal complaint that an individual files if certain drugs and services are not covered by their particular Medicare plan when they feel that they should be.

Co-pay – the portion of any medical services and / or prescription medications that you are responsible for paying.

Deductible – the amount of money that must be paid by the insured for medical care before Medicare covers any such expenses.

Doug dungeon hole – the coverage gap found in some Medicare drug plans (scheduled to close in 2020).

Dual eligibility – refers to being eligible for both Medicaid and Medicare.

Enrollment period – the limited time period that an individual can enroll in a health care plan or switch to a different one.

Grievance – a formal complaint made to Medicare when your health care plan or the person administrating medical treatment to you has treated you improperly or poorly.

Home health care – short-term care provided while you are recovering at home from an illness or injury. Occasional part-time skilled care as well as some medical equipment, services, and supplies are included in a home health care plan.

Hospice care – care administrated to those individuals with a terminal illness or medical condition (covered in Part A). Counseling and physical care are included.

Long-term care – Medicare does not cover ungoing health or personal care that an assisted living facility or a nursing home would provide.

Medicaid – federal and state programs that are separate from Medicare. This assists those individuals with limited assets and low incomes to pay for their medical expenses.

Medicare Advantage – alternative health care for Parts A and B that are provided by a private insurance carrier.

Medicare Part A – pays for hospitice care, hospital stays, and some home health care.

Medicare Part B – pays for lab tests, medical equipment, physician visits, and some medical services.

Medicare Part D – coverage that is provided for some brand name and generic medicines.

Medigap – private insurance that covers the gaps in Part A and Part B coverage. It is also sometimes referred to as Medicare Supplemental Insurance.

Out-of-pocket expenses – those expenses that you are responsible for and are not covered by Medicare insurance.

Premiums – payments for health care coverage that is usually made on a monthly basis.

Skilled nursing care – medical care provided by licensed LPN's (Licensed Practical Nurses) or RN's (Registered Nurses).

For more information, the entire Medicare glossary is available online at the US Government Site for Medicare.



Source by B. Loughead

Comparing Auto Insurance Prices Advice

It is scary how expensive car insurance can be these days! In order to get the best rate, it's important to shop around and compare prices from various insurance companies. Unfortunately, many of them do not make these comparisons easy on purpose because they do not want you to realize that you are paying too much for your insurance. The first thing you should do is contact your present insurance company to understand your existing policy. Make sure that it's what you think it is and request changes if you hear anything surprising. It's important to understand not only how much you are paying, but also what you are paying for: What is your deductible? How much coverage do you have for certain events like vandalism and an accident with an uninsured driver?

Once you understand your current policy, start calling around to check prices at other companies. It's important to request a quote on exactly the same coverage as you have now since you can not otherwise compare easily. Some companies will also allow you to request a quote via their website and this is something you can do without sitting on hold on the phone for long periods of time. Another option is to work with an auto insurance broker who has relationships with many insurance companies. They can understand your situation and get comparable quotes from a variety of providers in order to help you select the lowest one. This is a great choice if you do not have time to do the search for cheaper insurance yourself.



Source by Jim Tonkins

Automotive Redux – The 2010 Honda Insight

In 1999, Honda introduced the first mass produced hybrid car to the American market, the two-seater Insight. Oddly shaped and a bit out of place, it won the hearts of its owners as the car achieved an astounding 70 mpg, far outpacing anything else on the road. Alas, the Insight was never much of a sales magnet and was discontinued by Honda in 2006 as the Japanese automaker chose to offer a hybrid version of its popular Civic instead.

A new Insight is set to debut in 2009 as Honda seeks to gain fresh transaction in a high demand segment. Unlike the original model, the Insight will sport a cleaner design, get excellent fuel mileage, and be priced thousands of dollars less than the arch-rival Toyota Prius. In true Honda fashion the automaker is rather tight lipped about the new Insight, but we've gleaned the following information from our automated sources which we will share with you momentarily.

Introducing The 2010 Honda Insight

Yes, the Insight is on its way back to the states, in fresh form and ready to do battle. Here's what we know about this exciting model:

Styling cues from the FCX Clarity – Honda's test hydrogen vehicle is the FCX Clarity, an attractive model being tested in Japan and in California. Look for the Insight to borrow plenty of its looks from that hydrogen model.

Sharing components with the Fit – The Civic is no longer the tiniest of all Hondas, a distinction now associated to the Fit. Look for the Insight to use many of the same components found in the Fit while being powered by the same 1.3L engine found in the hybrid Civic.

Saving you money – Trying to find a Prius for $ 21,000 is nearly impossible with most models going out of Toyota showrooms priced at $ 23,000 on up. Honda says that the starting price for the Insight will be an industry leading $ 18,500!

Stretching your fuel further – Fuel mileage is the largest unknown with the new Insight, but this we do know: the car will beat the Prius and may actually top the original model's 71 mpg! Cars with air conditioning included (and running) will lower fuel numbers as will certain other variations, but topping 60 mpg on the highway and at least 50 mpg around town is a strong possibility for the Insight.

Honda Will Ramp Up Production

Honda has said that they plan on building 200,000 Insights annually with half those cars being shipped to the US. With gas prices hovering around $ 4 per gallon and a dearth of hybrid cars available, next summer's debut of the Insight will be welcome relief from pain at the pump for thousands of lucky drivers.



Source by Matthew Keegan

Vintage Car Insurance – How to Find the Best Rates

If you have a vintage car then it probably cost you a lot of money. Most people who buy vintage or classic cars do so not only because they like them, but because they see the vehicle as an investment. Once you have spent thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of thousands of dollars on a vintage car, you need to be sure that you have the right kind of insurance policy.

When you are shopping for car insurance you’ll find that the type of insurance you need will be different to that for ordinary cars. Once you start looking you should try and find an insurance company that specializes in insuring vintage cars. Vintage cars require specialist coverage. The type of coverage you will need will depend very much on how your car is used. You will need a different kind of premium if the car is only driven to specialist shows and exhibitions, than you would if you drove your vintage car like a regular vehicle.

Providing you take the time to look for the right kind of policy for your car, then it is possible to save money on car insurance. You should not insure a classic or vintage car under a standard insurance policy. If you have bought your car as an investment piece then you don’t want to be driving it around in the same way that you would an ordinary car.

There are guidelines for insuring different types of vehicles and you should be familiar with these before you insure your car. If you want an insurer to give you a good quote for your vintage car then you need to have been driving for at least five years as insurance companies want to protect your asset as much as you do. Providing you are twenty five or older it should be easy to find insurance for your vintage car as insurance companies will look on you as less of an insurance risk than a younger driver.

When you insure a car, insurers will want to assess both your security and your driving skills before they will allow you to take out a speciality premium. You should have a car that is old enough to be considered a vintage vehicle and this standard will depend on the company that you buy your insurance from.

Some insurance companies will only give vintage status to cars that are nineteen seventies vintage or older. You should know that policies will differ depending on the age of your car. Another thing that insurers will take into consideration is whether you have an insurance policy of an ordinary car before they grant you a special policy.

If you do tend to drive a vintage car on a daily basis then insurance companies may regard that car as too much of a risk, as the more a car is driven the sooner it is likely to deteriorate and decrease in value. Insurance companies offer special premiums based on the actual cash value (ACV) of your car, the stated value (SV) and the agreed value (AV) of the vehicle.

When you give the insurance company a value for your car they will pay it but they cannot insure you for the stated value. Most vintage car owners get their insurance on the basis of an agreed value of the car. This means that they will agree with you a value for your car and take into consideration your investment and any maintenance, and then they will give you a policy for that value.



Source by Andy Darwinson