Definitions Of The Most Common Medicare Terms

There are a number of Medicare terms that everyone should know if they are policy holders or are about to be. We have listed the more common ones below.

Appeal – a formal complaint that an individual files if certain drugs and services are not covered by their particular Medicare plan when they feel that they should be.

Co-pay – the portion of any medical services and / or prescription medications that you are responsible for paying.

Deductible – the amount of money that must be paid by the insured for medical care before Medicare covers any such expenses.

Doug dungeon hole – the coverage gap found in some Medicare drug plans (scheduled to close in 2020).

Dual eligibility – refers to being eligible for both Medicaid and Medicare.

Enrollment period – the limited time period that an individual can enroll in a health care plan or switch to a different one.

Grievance – a formal complaint made to Medicare when your health care plan or the person administrating medical treatment to you has treated you improperly or poorly.

Home health care – short-term care provided while you are recovering at home from an illness or injury. Occasional part-time skilled care as well as some medical equipment, services, and supplies are included in a home health care plan.

Hospice care – care administrated to those individuals with a terminal illness or medical condition (covered in Part A). Counseling and physical care are included.

Long-term care – Medicare does not cover ungoing health or personal care that an assisted living facility or a nursing home would provide.

Medicaid – federal and state programs that are separate from Medicare. This assists those individuals with limited assets and low incomes to pay for their medical expenses.

Medicare Advantage – alternative health care for Parts A and B that are provided by a private insurance carrier.

Medicare Part A – pays for hospitice care, hospital stays, and some home health care.

Medicare Part B – pays for lab tests, medical equipment, physician visits, and some medical services.

Medicare Part D – coverage that is provided for some brand name and generic medicines.

Medigap – private insurance that covers the gaps in Part A and Part B coverage. It is also sometimes referred to as Medicare Supplemental Insurance.

Out-of-pocket expenses – those expenses that you are responsible for and are not covered by Medicare insurance.

Premiums – payments for health care coverage that is usually made on a monthly basis.

Skilled nursing care – medical care provided by licensed LPN's (Licensed Practical Nurses) or RN's (Registered Nurses).

For more information, the entire Medicare glossary is available online at the US Government Site for Medicare.



Source by B. Loughead

Car Rental and Insurance Excess Options

One of the most onerous and misunderstood aspects about car rentals today is the accident / insurance aspect of it. When you are renting a hire car the rental companies, almost without exception, will try, and sometimes very hard, to convince you that it is in your best interests to add on to the daily rental a collision damage waiver (CDW) cost. There are other names for it but they all mean exactly the same.

Firstly your common sense will tell you that if it is good for you, it can not also be good for the company at the same time. So, what goes on here? Well, most companies, because of their exorbitant insurance premiums are automatically forced to self insure their vehicles. That means that they bear any accident costs themselves and offset that with the "CDW". It is far cheaper for them to do this way way than pay the huge insurance premiums for every car. The CDW factor then does become extra profit for the companies in the main and that is why they seriously urge you to take it up. Incidentally, legally speaking, in Australia the precedents in law concerning accident liability is that it rests with the owner of the vehicle unless you are acting as an agent for the owner, and it would be very unusual for the hirer to be acting as an " agent "for the owner.

Therefore it does require a lot of consideration as to whether or not you pay the extra to reduce your liability. Emotionally it is far less stressful to take the excess reduction and not be driving around with a high excess that has been significantly inflated in order to convince you that the CDW is a good idea. Practically speaking though, it does not take long for the CDW costs to add up and amount to more than paying the excess in the unofficial event you have an accident. Therein lays the dilemma!

Many people are under the mistaken belief that their normal credit card insurance will cover them for any accident excesses. This is not always the case as in many instances you are not covered for the excesses if the car rental company has offered you excess reduction. This is a very important point and one in which you must be absolutely clear on with your credit card company insurance.

So when the time comes to make your car hire booking, all the afore said needs to be considered carefully and a decision made as to whether or not you will be taking the CDW. Rest assured the car rental company will be pressuring you, in their own interests, to avail yourself of their offer.

Now, when the inconvenience does happen and you are involved in a car accident, there are several things to consider. Firstly I would be approaching the other driver or drivers, regardless of who is at fault, with a view to obtaining their full particulars, including the name of their insurer. Apart from that you need their license number and be sure that it contains their current address. Of course a lot of things here will depend on the severity of the accident, the attitude of the other people and the locations of the accident ie is it a busy place and are you able to leave the cars at the scene? As soon as possible it is wise to contact the rental car company, taking careful note of who you spoke to and when, and seeking there requirements with regard to accident report forms, which are sometimes provided in the glove box of the hire vehicle. Of course the police need to be informed should the accident be serious enough, and unfortunately, this is not always easy to determine.

Most unfortunately along with the trauma of the accident you will probably now have to deal with several extremely competitive and aggressive tow truck drivers. Whatever happens under no circumstances should you allow them to touch your rental car unless you are directed to do so by either the police or the car hire company. All tow truck drivers / companies are paid a highly inflated rate for what is called a "police tow". This tow will absolutely have to be paid for by someone and that someone could be you. On top of that the tow truck driver / company also receives a commission from any panel beater that he delivers the car to with which he has an arrangement. The reason for his "keenness" to tow your vehicle! Once he has your car hire vehicle attached to his truck it is very difficult or impossible to get him to release the car.

From this point on you will need to work with the car rental company to sort through all the details and most importantly, what happens next! You will probably have to pay the excess at this point and then set about recovering it should you not have been at fault.

Good luck and hopefully this article has been of some help and not put you off car rental!



Source by Teresa Farren-Price

It’s Smart to Plan That Next Vacation

A little time spent prior to your vacation will net big returns in stress reduction, memory building and costs. The better you plan the more fun you’ll have and the less money you will spend. Here are a few tips to assist you with your planning

1. Check and see if there are apartments, condos, or even home rentals available at your destination. Many of these are much less per person than a hotel, and a lot more private. They also offer many luxury features like pools, BBQs, kitchens and more. These properties are often near attractions and the owners often have a lot of inside information to make your travel more fun. Check out Bed & Breakfasts: off season, you may pay less for extravagant lodging and gourmet breakfasts than you’d pay for a ho-hum hotel. You can also look online for great deals on hotels. Remember to join their loyalty program; it will save you money on your next vacation.

2. Find out the off-season for your destination and travel then. There’s a world of difference between season and off-season rates. You will also have less of a fight for many of the attractions you are hoping to see. Often the weather is just as great a month before and a month after the high season and the savings are significant. One warning make sure to check the attractions you intend to see to make sure they are open or have different hours of operation in the off-season

3. Check out all-inclusive vacation packages which can save a great deal of money on tours/attractions, lodging, meals, and other amenities. In some places you can get multi-day passes to various amusements or special rates if you go later in the day. Cruises offer an amazing quality of service at an economical all-inclusive price. Cruise companies offer a wide variety of destinations and levels to meet any budget and interest.

4. Saving money on food is pretty easy and a lot of fun. If you are in a rental that offers a kitchen, cook some of your meals. Pick a restaurant or two that you really want to eat at and then plan the remaining meals at your place. It is a hoot to shop away from home. When we travel to Europe we really look forward to hitting the market to see what they have and see what the locals eat. If at a hotel, pick one with a breakfast included. By shopping at the grocers and preparing some of your own meals you will save money and keep off a few of those extra pounds restaurant food puts on you.

5. To get around once you’re at that vacation destination can be very expensive. Don’t be afraid of buses and light rail to get around town if it makes sense, you don’t always need a car. If there are a few of you, see if a car is cheaper in the long haul than taxies, busses, and trains. As a family of six we find that if we are staying in a specific town/venue for the vacation a car is a liability. However, with so many if we are traveling from one venue to another having a car is not only cheaper, but it offers a lot more flexibility

You can in fact have a great vacation without mortgaging the house.

Planning, some research, and an attitude focused on having a great time will help you to have a vacation that you and your family will remember fondly for years to come.



Source by Bill Littler